“Health“Healthy Rivers”
“Happy Communities”
“Healthy Environment for now and for future”
brn-01
brn-02
brn-03
brn-04
brn-05
brn-06
brn-07
brn-08
brn-09
brn-10
brn-11
brn-12
brn-13
brn-14
brn-15
brn-16
brn-17
Map of Dams in Myanmar Map of Dams in Myanmar Shan State From Wikipedia - Shan State (ရှမ်းပြည်နယ်, pronounced: [ʃáɴ pjìnɛ̀]; Shan: မိူင်းတႆး [mə́ŋ.táj]; Thai: รัฐฉาน) is a state of Myanmar. Shan State borders China to the north, Laos to the east, and Thailand to the south, and five administrative divisions of Burma in the west. Largest of the 14 administrative divisions by land area, Shan State covers 155,800 km², almost a quarter of the total area of Burma. The state gets its name from the Shan people, one of several ethnic groups that inhabit the area. Shan State is largely rural, with only three cities of significant size: Lashio, Kengtung, and the capital, Taunggyi.[3] Taungyyi is 150.7 km north east of the nation's capital Naypyitaw. Shan State, with many ethnic groups, is home to several armed ethnic armies. While the military government has signed ceasefire agreements with most groups, vast areas of the state, especially those east of the Thanlwin river, remain outside the central government's control, and in recent years have come under heavy ethnic-Chinese economic and political influence. Other areas are under the control of military groups such as the Shan State Army. Kayah(Karenni) State Kayah State (Burmese: ကယားပြည်နယ်, pronounced: [kəjá pjìnɛ̀] formerly, Karenni State) is a state of Myanmar. Situated in eastern Myanmar, it is bounded on the north by Shan State, on the east by Thailand's Mae Hong Son Province, and on the south and west by Kayin State. It lies approximately between 18° 30' and 19° 55' north latitude and between 94°40' and 97° 93' east longitude. The area is 11,670 km2 (4,510 sq mi). Its capital is Loikaw (also spelt Loi-kaw). The estimated population in 1998 was approximately 207,357, according to UNICEF. It is inhabited primarily by the Karenni ethnic group, also known as Red Karen or Kayah, a Sino-Tibetan people.) Madalay Division From Wikipedia - Mandalay Region (Burmese: မန္တလေးတိုင်းဒေသကြီး, pronounced: [máɴdəlé táiɴ dèθa̰ dʑí], formerly Mandalay Division) is an administrative division of Myanmar. It is located in the center of the country, bordering Sagaing Region and Magway Region to the west, Shan State to the east, and Bago Region and Kayin State to the south. The regional capital is Mandalay. In the south of the division lies the national capital of Naypyitaw. The division consists of seven districts, which are subdivided into 30 townships and 2,320 wards and village-tracts. Mandalay Region is important in Myanmar's economy, accounting for 15% of the national economy. Magway Division From Wikipedia - Magway Region (Magwe Region Burmese: မကွေးတိုင်းဒေသကြီး, pronounced: [məɡwé táiɴ dèθa̰ dʑí], formerly Magway Division) is an administrative division in central Myanmar. Magway Region is the second largest of Myanmar's seven divisions, with an area of 44,820 square kilometres (17,306 sq mi). Rakhine State From Wikipedia - Rakhine State (Burmese: ရခိုင်ပြည်နယ်; MLCTS: ra_khai_pray_nay, Rakhine pronunciation [ɹəkʰàiɴ pɹènè]; Burmese pronunciation: [jəkʰàiɴ pjìnɛ̀]; formerly Arakan) is a state in Myanmar. Situated on the western coast, it is bordered by Chin State to the north, Magway Region, Bago Region and Ayeyarwady Region to the east, the Bay of Bengal to the west, and the Chittagong Division of Bangladesh to the northwest. It is located approximately between latitudes 17°30' north and 21°30' north and east longitudes 92°10' east and 94°50' east. The Arakan Mountains, rising to 3,063 metres (10,049 ft) at Victoria Peak, separate Rakhine State from central Burma. Off the coast of Rakhine State there are some fairly large islands such as Cheduba and Myingun Island. Rakhine State has an area of 36,762 square kilometres (14,194 sq mi) and its capital is Sittwe Karen State From Wikipedia - Kayin State (Burmese: ကရင်ပြည်နယ်, pronounced: [kəjɪ̀ɴ pjìnɛ̀] also Karen State), Karen: ကညီကီၢ်ဆဲ [Kanyaw Kawhseh] is a state of Myanmar. The capital city is Hpa-An, also spelled Pa-An. The relief of Kayin State is mountainous with the Dawna Range running along the state in a NNW - SSE direction and the southern end of the Karen Hills in the northwest.[2] It is bordered by Mae Hong Son, Tak, and Kanchanaburi provinces of Thailand to the east; Mon State and Bago Region to the west and south; Mandalay Region, Shan State and Kayah State to the north. Taninthariyi Division From Wikipedia - Tanintharyi Region (Burmese: တနင်္သာရီတိုင်းဒေသကြီး, pronounced: [tənɪ́ɴθàjì táɪɴ dèθa̰ dʑí]; Mon: ဏၚ်ကသဳ or တနၚ်သြဳ; formerly Tenasserim Division and subsequently Tanintharyi Division, is an administrative region of Myanmar, covering the long narrow southern part of the country on the Kra Isthmus. It borders the Andaman Sea to the west and the Tenasserim Hills, beyond which lies Thailand, to the east. To the north is the Mon State. There are many islands off the coast, the large Mergui Archipelago in the southern and central coastal areas and the smaller Moscos Islands off the northern shores. The capital of the division is Dawei (Tavoy). Other important cities are Myeik (Mergui) and Kawthaung. The division covers an area of 43,344.9 km², and had a population of 1,406,434 at the 2014 Census. Mon State From Wikipedia - Mon State (Burmese: မွန်ပြည်နယ်, pronounced: [mʊ̀ɴ pjìnɛ̀]; Mon: တွဵုရးဍုၚ်မန်၊ ရးမညဒေသ) is an administrative division of Myanmar. It lies between Kayin State to the east, the Andaman Sea to the west, Bago Region to the north and Tanintharyi Region to the south, also having a short border with Thailand's Kanchanaburi Province at its south-eastern tip. The land area is 12,155 km2. The Dawna Range, running along the eastern side of the state in a NNW–SSE direction, forms a natural border with Kayin State. Mon State includes some small islands, such as Kalegauk, Wa Kyun and Kyungyi Island, along its 566 km of coastline. The state's capital is Mawlamyaing. Yangon Division From Wikipedia - Yangon Region (Burmese: ရန်ကုန်တိုင်းဒေသကြီး; MLCTS: rankun tuing desa. kri, pronounced: [jàɴɡòʊɴ táɪɴ dèθa̰ dʑí]; formerly Rangoon Division and Yangon Division) is an administrative region of Myanmar. Located in the heart of Lower Myanmar, the division is bordered by Bago Region to the north and east, the Gulf of Martaban to the south, and Ayeyarwady Region to the west. Yangon Region is dominated by its capital city of Yangon, the former national capital and the largest city in the country. Other important cities are Thanlyin and Twante. The division is the most developed region of the country and the main international gateway. The division measures 10,170 km2 (3,930 sq mi). Ayawaddy Division From Wikipedia - Ayeyarwady Region (Burmese: ဧရာဝတီတိုင်းဒေသကြီး, pronounced: [ʔèjàwədì táiɴ dèθa̰ dʑí]; formerly Ayeyarwady Division and Irrawaddy Division) is a region of Myanmar, occupying the delta region of the Ayeyarwady River (Irrawaddy River). It is bordered by Bago Region to the north, Bago Region and Yangon Region to the east, and the Bay of Bengal to the south and west. It is contiguous with the Rakhine State in the northwest. The region lies between north latitude 15° 40' and 18° 30' approximately and between cast longitude 94° 15' and 96° 15'. It has an area of 35,140 square kilometres (13,566 sq mi). The population is over 6.5 million, making it the most populous of Burma’s states and regions. According to the National Census 2014 of Myanmar, there are 6175123 population in Ayeyarwady Region Ayeyarwady Region is flanked by the Rakhine Yoma (Arakan Mountains) range in the west and large areas were cleared for paddy cultivation, leading to its preeminent position as the main rice producer in the country, a position it has retained into the 21st century. It has also a number of lakes. Of the rivers branching out from the mighty Ayeyarwady, Ngawun, Pathein and Toe are famous. The capital city of Ayeyarwady division is Pathein. Chaungtha Beach and Ngwesaung Beach are popular resorts for both foreigners and Burma people. They are located in west side of Ayeyarwady Region, one hours distance from Pathein city and four hours from Yangon city by road transportation. Pago Division From Wikipedia - Bago Region (Burmese: ပဲခူးတိုင်းဒေသကြီး, pronounced: [bəɡó táɪɴ dèθa̰ dʑí]; formerly Pegu Division and Bago Division) is an administrative region of Myanmar, located in the southern central part of the country. It is bordered by Magway Region and Mandalay Region to the north; Kayin State, Mon State and the Gulf of Martaban to the east; Yangon Region to the south and Ayeyarwady Region and Rakhine State to the west. It is located between 46°45'N and 19°20'N and 94°35'E and 97°10'E. Chin State From Wikipedia - Chin State (Burmese: ချင်းပြည်နယ်; MLCTS: hkyang: pranynai, pronounced: [tɕʰɪ́ɴ pjìnɛ̀]) is a state in western Myanmar. The 36,019-square-kilometre (13,907 sq mi) Chin State is bordered by Rakhine State in the south, Bangladesh in the south-west, Sagaing Division and Magway Division in the east, the Indian state of Manipur in the north and the Indian state of Mizoram in the west. The population of Chin state is about 478,801 in 2014 census. The capital of the state is Hakha. The state is a mountainous region with few transportation links. Chin State is sparsely populated and remains one of the least developed areas of the country. Chin State has the highest poverty rate of 73% as per the released figures from the first official survey Kachin State From Wikipedia - Kachin State (Burmese: ကချင်ပြည်နယ်, pronounced: [kətɕʰɪ̀ɴ pjìnɛ̀]; Kachin: Jingphaw Mungdaw) is the northernmost state of Myanmar. It is bordered by China to the north and east; Shan State to the south; and Sagaing Region and India to the west. It lies between north latitude 23° 27' and 28° 25' longitude 96° 0' and 98° 44'. The area of Kachin State is 89,041 km2 (34,379 sq mi). The capital of the state is Myitkyina. Other important towns include Bhamo and Putao. Kachin State has Myanmar's highest mountain, Hkakabo Razi (5,889 metres (19,321 ft)), forming the southern tip of the Himalayas, and a large inland lake, Indawgyi Lake. Kachin State From Wikipedia - From Wikipedia - Kachin State (Burmese: ကချင်ပြည်နယ်, pronounced: [kətɕʰɪ̀ɴ pjìnɛ̀]; Kachin: Jingphaw Mungdaw) is the northernmost state of Myanmar. It is bordered by China to the north and east; Shan State to the south; and Sagaing Region and India to the west. It lies between north latitude 23° 27' and 28° 25' longitude 96° 0' and 98° 44'. The area of Kachin State is 89,041 km2 (34,379 sq mi). The capital of the state is Myitkyina. Other important towns include Bhamo and Putao. Kachin State has Myanmar's highest mountain, Hkakabo Razi (5,889 metres (19,321 ft)), forming the southern tip of the Himalayas, and a large inland lake, Indawgyi Lake. Click Khaunglanphu Click Phizaw Click Lakin Click Pashe Click Chibwe Click Irrawaddy Myintsone Click Laiza N'Mai Hka River Mali Hka River Click Dapein-2 Click Dapein-1 Click Shweli-1 Click Shweli-3 Click Shweli-2 Click Upper Salween Click Noung Pha & Man Taung Click Mong Tom Click Kengtawng Click Yeywa Myintnge River Salween River Ywathit Click Lawpita Click Upper Paunglong Click Lower Paunglong Paunglong River Irrawaddy River Click Weigi Click Dagwi Click Hatgyi Shweli River Mekong River China Lao Thailand India BANGLADESH Kaladan River ANDAMAN SEA Sagaing Division From Wikipedia - Sagaing Region (Burmese: စစ်ကိုင်းတိုင်းဒေသကြီး, pronounced: [zəɡáiɴ táiɴ dèθa̰ dʑí], formerly Sagaing Division) is an administrative region of Myanmar, located in the north-western part of the country between latitude 21° 30' north and longitude 94° 97' east. It is bordered by India’s Nagaland, Manipur, and Arunachal Pradesh States to the north, Kachin State, Shan State, and Mandalay Region to the east, Mandalay Region and Magway Region to the south, with the Ayeyarwady River forming a greater part of its eastern and also southern boundary, and Chin State and India to the west. The region has an area of 93,527 km². In 1996, it had a population of over 5,300,000 while its population in 2012 was 6,600,000. The urban population in 2012 was 1,230,000 and the rural population was 5,360,000.[2] The capital is Monywa. Click Tamanthi Chindwin River Irrawaddy River Mouth of Irrawaddy Bay ofBengal Existing Dams Proposed & Under Plan Dams

 Message From Burma Rivers Network

Large dams are being constructed on all of Burma’s major rivers and tributaries by Chinese, Thai and Indian companies. The dams are causing displacement, militarization, human rights abuses, and irreversible environmental damage, threatening the livelihoods and food security of millions. The power and revenues generated are going to the military regime and neighbouring countries.

There is complete military control of energy development in Burma and no processes that allow for information disclosure, public participation or implementation of proper standards for dam-building. Neighbouring countries benefit from this situation by gaining electricity without bearing the social and environmental costs.

To ensure transparency and accountability, the recognition of rights, and social justice in energy development projects, a democratically-elected government is needed in Burma. All investments in large dam projects in Burma must be stopped until that time, when sustainable energy policies can be developed.

The Burma Rivers Network invites you to join us to protect the health and biodiversity of river ecosystems, and to protect the rights of communities negatively impacted by large-scale river development. Please contact us at brn.burmariversnetwork@gmail.com or visit this website for updates on current campaigns.

 

Moving beyond the Myitsone dam dilemma
Friday, 02 December 2016
new madalay LIU YUN - 01 DEC, 2016How a historical border treaty between China and Myanmar could keep both countries out of troubled waters when it... Read More...
FIRE ON THE SALWEEN: DAMS IN CONFLICT ZONES COULD THREATEN MYANMAR’S FRAGILE PEACE PROCESS
Thursday, 01 December 2016
MONGABAY 1 December 2016 / Demelza StokesThe five large hydroelectric projects planned for Myanmar’s stretch of the Salween River all fall in or... Read More...
Killing the Mekong, Dam by Dam
Tuesday, 29 November 2016
THE DIPLOMAT Regional governments have been underestimating the environmental and economic costs of Mekong dams. By Tom Fawthrop | November 28,... Read More...
Hundreds of Shan farmers protest Upper Yeywa dam
Tuesday, 29 November 2016
MYANMAR TIMES By Thu Thu Aung | Tuesday, 29 November 2016More than 1500 farmers from 19 townships gathered on the banks of the Namtu River in... Read More...
Minister eyes commission to manage Thanlwin River
Friday, 25 November 2016
MYANMAR TIMES By Pyae Thet Phyo | Thursday, 24 November 2016 A Union minister is trying to launch a new tripartite commission for management of the... Read More...
DAMMING THE SALWEEN: WHAT NEXT FOR SOUTHEAST ASIA’S LAST GREAT FREE-FLOWING RIVER?
Friday, 25 November 2016
MONGABAY 23 November 2016 / Demelza StokesMyanmar, Thailand and China have big plans to harness the Salween’s vast hydro-electric potential,... Read More...
Hydropower review taskforce stalls, waiting for instructions
Tuesday, 22 November 2016
MYANMAR TIMES By Ye Mon | Tuesday, 22 November 2016 A commission member on the taskforce reviewing hydropower projects said the team has yet to hear... Read More...
Opponents call for cancellation of Hat Gyi Dam
Tuesday, 22 November 2016
THE NATION November 22, 2016 01:00  | By THE NATIONTHE People’s Network of the Salween River has called for an immediate halt to construction of... Read More...
Changing Mekong Currents Compound Dam Anxieties in Southeast Asia
Monday, 21 November 2016
THE DIPLOMAT Several factors are disrupting the terrain for investment in large hydropower dams, and governments should take note. By Courtney... Read More...
China continues to court on Myitsone project ahead of commission presser
Sunday, 20 November 2016
MYANMAR TIMES By Lillian Kalish | Friday, 18 November 2016 As the commission tasked with reviewing hydropower projects along the upper reaches of the... Read More...
OUR RIVER…, OUR LIFE…
Monday, 14 November 2016
Karen News Published November 13, 2016  •  Author - Saw Doo Plout and Karen News Plans to build dams on the Salween River by the Burma... Read More...
Myanmar Probes Whether to Resume Construction of Controversial Chinese-Backed Dam
Monday, 14 November 2016
Nature World News By Monica Antonio Nov 14, 2016 04:45 AM ESTMyanmar is currently probing on whether to continue building the construction of China's... Read More...
Hydroelectric dams shown to increase neurotoxins in surrounding soil
Thursday, 10 November 2016
ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY By Jack LoughranPublished Wednesday, November 9, 2016 Hydroelectric dams have been found to increase the level of the... Read More...
IMAGE Afraid to Go Home: Recent Violent Conflict and Human Rights Abuses in Karen State
Thursday, 13 November 2014
The following report was prepared by Karen Rivers Watch (KRW), a coalition of six Karen organizations focused on the environment, women, youth, human... Read More...
IMAGE One cannot step into the same river twice: making the Kaladan Project people-centred
Wednesday, 31 July 2013
This report from the Kaladan Movement provides an update on the progress of the Kaladan Project; assesses the potential Project-related benefits and... Read More...
IMAGE Chronology of the Myitsone Dam at the Confluence of Rivers above Myitkyina
Monday, 27 May 2013
Sources: New Light of Myanmar, Myanmar Times, Irrawaddy, Mizzima, Weekly Eleven, The Voice, Open News, 7 Day News, Kachin News, Damming the... Read More...

Development in Burma

Thai Investor/Company Profiles
Thursday, 11 September 2008
Read More...
Other Investor/Company Profiles
Thursday, 11 September 2008
Read More...
Chinese Investor/Company Profiles
Thursday, 11 September 2008
        Read More...
Burmese Investor/Company Profiles
Thursday, 11 September 2008
    Read More...
Hydropower Guidelines
Tuesday, 19 August 2008
The World Commission on Dams (WCD)The WCD was an independent, international, multi-stakeholder process which addressed the controversial issues... Read More...
IMAGE China’s Dam Industry
Tuesday, 19 August 2008
China’s overseas dam industry is building hundreds of dams around the world, particularly in Southeast Asia and Africa. The guide The New Great... Read More...
Burma’s River Law
Tuesday, 19 August 2008
The Conservation of Water Resources and Rivers Law was adopted by the State Peace and Development Council on October 2, 2006. To see the full text of... Read More...
About Dams
Tuesday, 19 August 2008
Frequently Asked Questions About Damswww.internationalrivers.orgDams: What They Are and What They Dowww.internationalrivers.orgBasic Dam... Read More...
Articles View Hits
2692744